Monday, September 01, 2014

Graphic Novel Review: LEGO NINJAGO #10: WHO IS THE PHANTOM NINJA?



The small and once quiet village of Nom has been overtaken by an army of Ninroids. The Masters of Spinjitsu arrive and believe the Overlord is up to no good. However, when they attempt to discover what exactly is going on they run into the Phantom Ninja. The Phantom Ninja seems to be a friend, but could possibly be a foe in disguise. So, the Masters of Spinjitsu must concoct a plan that will not only allow them to discover the motives of the Phantom Ninja, but also destroy the Ninroids in Nom. Overall, LEGO NINJAGO #10: WHO IS THE PHANTOM NINJA? is a great addition to the Lego Ninjago graphic novel stories.

Sunday, August 17, 2014

Graphic Novel Review: ANNOYING ORANGE #5: TRANSFARMERS: FOOD PROCESSORS IN DISGUISE!



That pesky & wisecracking citrus fruit and his friends are back for more adventures in ANNOYING ORANGE #5: TRANSFARMERS: FOOD PROCESSORS IN DISGUISE! In the title story, Annoying Orange and his food stuff friends are warned by the powerful Cosmic Cucumber that Earth is about to be invaded by some machines from a different world that will strip the planet of anything that is edible. Annoying Orange and his friends are chosen and agree to stop the machines and save the planet.

Other stories in ANNOYING ORANGE #5: TRANSFARMERS: FOOD PROCESSORS IN DISGUISE! are:

"The Annoying Apple?" – Apple makes a riddle and attempts to be as annoying as Orange.

"Orange Tries a New Hobby" – Orange tries out several different hobbies.

"Nightmare Pear" – Pear can't get a good night's sleep because he keeps having nightmares. He goes to
Nerville for help.

"A Sticky Situation" – Nerville fixes the air duct problems in the store with help from his friend Duct
Tape.

"The Passion Fruit Diaries" – Passion Fruit writes in her diary about her date with Orange.

"Ask Orange" – Orange hosts a call-in segment on a radio program.

"The Adventures of Coconut Custard Pie!" – A Coconut Custard Pie has dreams of making the big time.

"I Was a 1 ½ Gram Softie" – Marshmallow is abused at the beach by a Watermelon.

"Gratitude" – Nerville rescues a mouse from a mousetrap and later has the favor repaid.

"Hamlet" – Annoying Orange recites Hamlet's famous "To be or not to be" soliloquy.

"An Offer You Can't Refuse" – A demon tries to get Orange to sell his soul.

I'm not a huge fan of Annoying Orange, but I enjoyed reading this graphic novel.

Friday, August 08, 2014

The Reason Ranger Smith Is So Jolly

http://www.theargylesweater.com/
"The Argyle Sweater" Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Friday, July 25, 2014

9 TO 5

I should have mentioned this earlier, but if you are anywhere close near the Highland, IL area this weekend or next, you should come out and see 9 TO 5. It's a musical stage version of the famous 1980 movie that starred Dolly Parton, Jane Fonda, and Lily Tomlin. Dolly wrote all the music and lyrics for the show. I play five different characters in the show. The shows are always great shows and often the quality is just as good as some of the professional theatres in St. Louis. Plus, the theatre is air conditioned, so it's a great way to beat the heat. If you purchase your tickets online you can save a couple bucks than if you buy them at the door.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Jesus Vs. McDonald's Advertising

Thursday, July 10, 2014

It's Not Manna from Heaven

From "Inherit the Mirth" by Cuyler Black

Offering and Sin Tax

-from Thom Tapp

Sunday, July 06, 2014

Graphic Novel Review: DRAGON GIRL: THE SECRET VALLEY



The title character of DRAGON GIRL: THE SECRET VALLEY is an eleven-year-old girl named Alanna. She and her brother are orphans from a lower class background and are doing the best they can to survive in the medieval-type world in which they live. Alanna's brother Hamel works as a blacksmith and in his "free time" the two hunt and scourge the woods for game and edibles. One day while Alanna is out in the woods while Hamel is working, she discovers a baby dragon and a cave full of dragon eggs and discovers that dragons aren't the horrible creatures she has been led to believe. She's excited to share her discovery with her brother, but doesn't reveal her secret when she realizes that he's as frightened of and seems as hateful of dragons as most of the other people in the world. Alanna designs a dragon costume to wear in an attempt to get close to the creature and not get burned up in the process. Soon Alanna finds herself swept up in a journey that takes her to the secret valley of the dragons where she learns more and more about dragons. However, not everyone in the world is as fascinated by dragons and the famed knight Sir Cedric follows Alanna and becomes determined not only to rid the world of dragons, but steal the liquid treasure they seem to protect.


I enjoyed reading DRAGON GIRL: THE SECRET VALLEY. It's an exciting story with some great black and white illustrations. Many similar stories to DRAGON GIRL have a male protagonist and I found it interesting to have a female protagonist instead. There are some dangerous elements in the story, so the book might not be appropriate for children younger than five, but it should be fine for anyone older than that. Overall, a good story for anyone who enjoys graphic novels or dragons or graphic novels with dragons.

Thursday, July 03, 2014

Church Attendance

by: Jonny Hawkins

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Potluck and Pool Noodles

by: Jonny Hawkins

Saturday, June 21, 2014

Graphic Novel Review: ATHENA: GREY-EYED GODDESS



Written and illustrated by George O'Connor, ATHENA: GREY-EYED GODDESS is the second volume in a graphic novel series entitled "The Olympians" that tells the story of the ancient Greek gods and their mythology. ATHENA isn't an origins story, although there is a very brief introduction that summarizes the events of the first volume in the series (ZEUS: KING OF THE GODS). Instead, ATHENA is a story narrated by the Fates that tells four distinct tales about Athena: how she came to possess Zeus' aegis, how she defeated the giant Pallas, what she did with Medusa's decapitated head after Perseus used it, and her weaving contest with Arachne. The stories are each different and reveal distinct characteristics of Athena. Although the book doesn't strictly follow some of the more canonical elements with certain Greek myths, the book does an excellent job of combining many of those varying and sometimes conflicting stories into a unified whole. Although tastefully done, ATHENA doesn't shy away from the violence contained in many of these ancient tales. The tales of Athena are wonderfully illustrated and lend themselves well to the visual medium of a graphic novel. The inside of the book contains a genealogical chart which is extremely useful while reading these tales of Greek mythology. At the end of the book, there is a note from the author, some notes about the text, a few charts about various characters in the story (Perseus, Medusa, and the Fates), a bibliography, and some discussion questions. ZEUS: KING OF THE GODS was the origin story of the universe of the Olympian series and I like the way the series is progressing, now focusing on just one Olympian each. Overall, ATHENA: GREY-EYED GODDESS is a great book that anyone with an interest in Greek mythology is sure to appreciate.

Graphic Novel Review: ZEUS-KING OF THE GODS



Written and illustrated by George O'Connor, ZEUS: KING OF THE GODS is the first in a graphic novel series entitled "The Olympians" that tells the story of the ancient Greek gods and their mythology. ZEUS: KING OF THE GODS isn't just an origin story about Zeus. It's also an origin story about the creation of the universe and the world according to the ancient Greeks: from Kaos came Gaea (Mother Earth), from Gaea came Ouranos, and from Ouranos & Gaea came Kronos, and from Kronos came Zeus. ZEUS: KING OF THE GODS explains what happened to Zeus' ancestors, how Zeus freed his siblings, and the war that raged between Zeus and Olympians and the Titans. Although tastefully done, the story doesn't shy away from the violence surrounding the creature of the universe. The story is wonderfully illustrated and lends itself well to the visual medium of a graphic novel. At the end of the book, there is a note from the author, some notes about the text, a few charts about various characters in the story (Cyclopes, Metis, and Kronos), a bibliography, and some study questions. Overall, ZEUS: KING OF THE GODS is a great book that anyone with an interest in Greek mythology is sure to appreciate.